Prodigy Feat 5e: Should You Take & What To Do With It

This guide here will explain and breakdown the Prodigy in DnD 5e. One of the more uncommon feats in DnD. Let’s get into it, shall we? 

What Is the Prodigy Feat in DnD 5e?

The Prodigy feat in DnD 5e is only available to Half-Elves, Half-Orcs or Humans. This feat grants you one skill proficiency, one tool proficiency, and a new language of your choice.

In addition to this, you also gain expertise in a skill of your choice that doesn’t already benefit from a separate feature, such as expertise itself, which means you can’t stack expertise on a single skill using this feat. 

Prodigy

Prerequisite: Half-Elf, Half-Orc, or Human

You have a knack for learning new things. You gain the following benefits:

  • You gain one skill proficiency of your choice, one tool proficiency of your choice, and fluency in one language of your choice.
  • Choose one skill in which you have proficiency. You gain expertise with that skill, which means your proficiency bonus is doubled for any ability check you make with it. The skill you choose must be one that isn’t already benefiting from a feature, such as Expertise, that doubles your proficiency bonus.

Source: Xanathar’s Guide to Everything

Now that you can see what it does for yourself, let’s break it down a bit. 

I Fit the Race Requirements, But Should I Take It?

This feat is great if you’re playing a class that lacks proficiencies, as you not only get an additional proficiency but also a tool proficiency and a new language, which can have a lot of uses depending on your campaign setting.

You also get expertise as well, which, in my opinion, is beneficial to any character in DnD.

Let’s say you want to become proficient in investigation checks as you’re playing a hunter or scavenger of sorts. Not only can you do that, but you also have the option to grant proficiency in investigation.

You can just straight up bump it up to expertise right away if you so desire. 

Not many classes get expertise, which makes this feat a viable option for most classes as long as you fit the race requirement.

Rogues have expertise and Bards do to a degree as well, which just proves that it’s not common.

This feat is likely to have a far greater benefit when used out of combat, which might turn away some players, but nevertheless, you could gain proficiency in perception and then bump it up to expertise, which is vital for characters in DnD in almost all cases.

Is This Feat Better Than Skill Expert?

Before we can determine if this feat is better than its counterpart, let me explain what Skill Expert does. 

Skill Expert

You have honed your proficiency with particular skills, granting you the following benefits:

  • Increase one ability score of your choice by 1 to a maximum of 20.
  • You gain proficiency in one skill of your choice.
  • Choose one skill in which you have proficiency. You gain expertise with that skill, which means your proficiency bonus is doubled for any ability check you make with it. The skill you choose must be one that isn’t already benefiting from a feature, such as Expertise, that doubles your proficiency bonus.

Source: Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything

As you can see, Skill Expert doesn’t grant you a tool proficiency or a language, but it does grant a +1 to any skill of your choice as a trade-off.

In my personal opinion, I do think Skill Expert has the edge over Prodigy for the simple reason that it grants a stat bonus.

Most players tend to take feats that provide some bonus to stats as taking a feat requires you to pass on taking the +2 stat boost.

Skill Expert is also available to any race, whereas Prodigy is only available to Half-Elves, Half-Orcs, and Humans. You can see our Skill Expert guide for more information on this feat. 

Is This Feat Worth It? 

If you’re lacking certain skills and are looking for a quick boost, then this feat is definitely the best for bumping up your proficiencies. Unfortunately, it doesn’t provide any stat bonuses some DnD players might look for.

I personally think it’s worth it if you’re looking to add more skill proficiencies and some expertise to your character.

The addition of the tool and language proficiency also helps, especially if your campaign is centered more around RP.

This feat isn’t one to be ignored, and it provides a lot of great benefits to any character as long as you meet the race requirements, of course.

As I always say, the choice to take it is entirely up to you.