Weapon Master Feat – Master ALL The Weapons

Are you ready to master all the weapons? Are you ready to become proficient with multiple weapons? If so then the Weapon Master feat is the choice for you!

This guide will hopefully prove to you that this feat is still a viable option for most classes looking to increase their combat prowess. 

What Is the Weapon Master Feat in DnD 5e? 

The Weapon Master feat allows you to increase your Strength or Dexterity score by 1 (up to a max of 20) and allows you to gain proficiency with up to 4 weapons, which can be simple or martial weapons such as Greatsword, Greataxe, Warpick, Sling, Heavy Crossbow, Light Crossbow and anything else on either list. 

Weapon Master

You have practiced extensively with a variety of weapons, gaining the following benefits:

  • Increase your Strength or Dexterity score by 1 to a maximum of 20.
  • You gain proficiency with four weapons of your choice. Each one must be a simple or a martial weapon.

Source: Player’s Handbook

Should You Take This Feat? Is It Really Worth It?

Personally, I believe there are better options out there. Take the fighter class for example.

You’re already proficient in both simple and martial weapons. You may as well just take the ability score increase and get the +2 instead. It’s completely useless in this case.

Most classes are proficient in either simple or martial weapons anyway, and there are better feats that also grant a +1 to a stat as well as a more beneficial feat, such as Slasher, Skill Expert, and one of my personal favorites, Resilient

This feat is one of those “overlooked” feats, but it’s for good reason, especially when you compare it to other feats, like the ones I listed above.

This feat doesn’t provide any unique or mechanical buffs, and most classes are proficient with the most optimal weapons for their class anyway, so the desire to take this feat is extremely low.

There’s not a lot to dive into with this feat; even at a glance most seasoned players will turn to other feats unless they’re looking to add some unique flavor to their character.

If that’s the case, you most certainly can with this feat.  

What Benefit Can You Actually Gain From This? 

This feat may not provide you with a big buff after taking it, but it does have its uses.

For example, if you’re a rogue and you’re looking for some proficiencies with crossbows and a slight stat bonus to your Dex, you could take this feat.

A cleric that is looking for proficiency with several martial weapons could also take this feat if he/she so wished.

Perhaps in your world there are some unique weapons that require additional or unique proficiency to use effectively, such as Firearms or exotic weapons; you could take this feat and acquire those proficiencies for such weapons. 

Of course, these are quite odd circumstances that likely won’t occur in your typical D&D campaign or story.

There are also other ways around it, but if they do, you may consider this feat as an option; otherwise it doesn’t provide many benefits as it’s greatly overlooked by far superior feats.

In my opinion, you should take something else. If you’re looking for additional weapon proficiencies, consider multiclassing into a class that will grant you them.

Plus, multiclassing will grant you abilities from that class as well which will be far better than if you were to take this feat. Ultimately it’s up to you!